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 THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)

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Loomis
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Wed Aug 15, 2012 11:52 am

I quite enjoyed THE BOURNE LEGACY. Granted, it's hands down the worst film of the franchise (then again, the other three are truly excellent, so coming last does not automatically disgrace this flick), and boy does it have a lot of problems, but, still, it has its moments. This isn't the TERMINATOR SALVATION of the Bourne series - not quite, anyway.

The main problem - apart from a storyline that's, frankly, just plain stupid - is that the film is an inordinately talky affair that meanders about like nobody's business and sometimes seems to come to a grinding halt. Then again, it's pleasingly light on action (relative to its predecessors) and it does have some meaty dramatic moments.... as well as its share of scenes that fall flat on their faces. It's a real mixed bag. In some ways, LEGACY is refreshing, because Gilroy does at least attempt to take the series in a new direction (happily, he does not try to ape Greengrass' style), and there are a couple of elements that go against genre convention. In other respects, though, this flick is just another helping of the same old warmed-over spy stuff.

I didn't miss Damon, although I did miss John Powell's music, which I consider to be as essential a part of the Bourne outings as Barry's music is of the world of Bond.

BTW, is it just me or
Spoiler:
 
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tiffanywint
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:33 pm

Largo's Shark wrote:
Quote :
Born Cynical
by Armond White on Aug 10, 2012 • 4:45 am



Bourne reboot undone by its own legacy

Already obsolete, last decade’s financially successful Bourne trilogy–The Bourne Identity (2002), The Bourne Supremacy, (2004), The Bourne Ultimatum, (2007)–needed re-booting to suit the new administration’s political pragmatism (the persistence of foreign policies and espionage strategies once deemed unpopular). But the series’ awful rote cynicism (characterizing ruthless, degenerate American identity) was powered by Bush-hatred more than the Robert Ludlum source novels. The films were part of the post-2000 election political contempt and national self-loathing that now proves too strong to die. It infects self-congratulatory Hollywood to this day–and so deeply that it even ruins Tony Gilroy’s amped-up attempt to turn the Bourne series’ anomie into a love story.

This time Matt Damon’s paradigmatic Bourne is replaced by another rogue agent Aaron Cross/ Kenneth Kitsom (Jeremy Renner) put on the kill list by noxious CIA chief Byer (Edward Norton), along with several other players–all Bourniacs who embarrass the Agency’s mission.

Sinister Byer explains “We’re Sin-Eaters. We are morally indefensible and absolutely necessary.” His bromide’s directed at personnel who missed A Few Good Men and can’t handle the truth such as government scientist Marta Shearling (Rachel Weisz) who previously drugged agents as part of a diabolical plan to dope-up super spies .When Cross/Kitsom contacts Marta about his addiction, she’s survived an in-house massacre (having also been put on the kill list) and the two renegades–rebelling against the system–fall in love. It’s mutual anti-Americanism.

This kind of neo-noir, replete with political skepticism and action-movie blatancy, isn’t simply sentimental. It mixes romance, violence and cynicism. Its hypocritical message: “Don’t trust the government” even if you’re both killers in love. He’s a vet of Operation Iraqi Freedom (still wearing his damaged youth face from The Hurt Locker plus the pugilist fatigue of Daniel Craig‘s Bond); she’s interested in “Behavioral designs, programmable behavior,” though she never resolves her part in the death of a hunky agent. Gilroy is interested in genre mechanisms (including a Sunset Boulevard floating narrator’s body reference) not human interrelations. He shows career-best kinetic skill (more than past Bourne directors); still, the franchise feels empty.

During the big laboratory massacre scene, we don’t know the characters being slain, it’s just a bloodbath. The climactic motorcycle chase features James Newton Howard’s Morriconesque music score but the action is just a meaningless workout with more anonymous killings. The Bourne films pretend political sensitivity but Gilroy doesn’t seem to care about the humanity of the characters he kills off. Strange that Hollywood is attracted to Borne ciphers who kill without feeling; the condemnation of political butchers bounces back on Hollywood.

[url=http://cityarts.info/2012/08/10/born-cynicism/
http://cityarts.info/2012/08/10/born-cynicism/[/quote[/url]]

Thank you Armond. "But the series’ awful rote cynicism (characterizing ruthless, degenerate American identity) was powered by Bush-hatred more than the Robert Ludlum source novels. The films were part of the post-2000 election political contempt and national self-loathing that now proves too strong to die. It infects self-congratulatory Hollywood to this day"

Well said. This attitude is not as apparent in the first film, Identity, which is actually a decent update of the original novel, however IMO its all downhill after that with Supremacy and Ultimatum. These films bear no resemblance to the Ludlum novels, that they take their names from, which is one thing, but they are also alien to the tone of Ludlums broader literary ouevre. He published 23 novels before he died, 21 of them bearing his trademark suspense style. Each of the 21 is a stand-alone tour de force, page-turner. His books were impossible to put down. He was a master of tension and suspense. Ludlum however did not write with the same hyperactive degree of cynicism towards US intelligence efforts as the Bourne film producers seem to revel in. Rather he wrote smartly of conspiracies that reached into the highest levels of government, international commerce, intelligence circles, secret societies etc. It was riveting stuff. Occasionally escapist and venturing into Bond territory too. Several other film adaptations of his work have been done, notably The Osterman Weekend with Rutger Hauer and The Chancellor Manuscript with Michael Caine. These films were respectful of his work as was the original Bourne TV series with Richard Chamberlain.

But the Damon Bourne series goes right off the reservation. Good for Armond for calling them out and he's probably never even read the Ludlum books, but he can spot the cynicism which permeates the films, including the latest where it seems to be ramped up to new levels, whilst being completely devoid of any kind of interesting story, never mind a comprehensible one. Damon's Supremacy and Ultimatum can at least work as entertaining cinema fare, even if they insist on beating one over the head with their bizarre world view, but the newest Legacy barely even manages to entertain IMO. Renner and Weisz somewhat save the film, in that they do what they can with their characters, but Norton and his gang of ruthless coldblooded spymasters, operating from their high-tech control rooms, is just more more of the same recycled garbage that we saw in the last two films.

If you really want to enjoy the Bourne Identity, and that's what it is, an Identity, do yourself a favour and read the three original novels. Jason Bourne is an extremely well drawn literary character. You'll laugh at these crappy movies after reading the Ludlum originals.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:36 pm

Personally, I found the Ludlum Bourne books to be quite dull.

::ducks::
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:43 pm

Harmsway wrote:
Personally, I found the Ludlum Bourne books to be quite dull.

::ducks::

You said books, plural. Why would you read two if they were that "dull" ;)

My experience was that I read Bourne Identity first and was then hooked into reading them all. Aside from Fleming he's the only suspense writer who has compelled me to read his entire catalogue.Others I dabble with, but with any writer, personal taste comes into play, but personally I think Ludlum is top of the pile when it comes to suspense thrillers.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:50 pm

Well, I never really got on with the literary Bourne. The films are much, much better. I read THE BOURNE IDENTITY (can't recall whether I finished it) and tried THE BOURNE SUPREMACY but if memory serves gave up on it pretty quickly. For some reason, I read (and finished) Eric Van Lustbader's THE BOURNE LEGACY (2004). We're talking Benson Bond territory - so-so entertainment but certainly nothing special.

Astonishingly, there are now no fewer than six Bourne continuation novels. Where will it end?
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 1:00 pm

Loomis wrote:

Astonishingly, there are now no fewer than six Bourne continuation novels. Where will it end?

There are 7 on shelves now. I don't think its ever going to end, until they stop selling. Ludlum is a cottage industry. There are also 8 novels and counting in the "Ludlum inspired" Covert One series. They are hit and miss as reads, mostly miss IMO.

And theyv'e now launched a Janson continuation series based on his final novel the Janson Directive, the first installment of which was awful.

The EVL Bourne continuation novels I find to be quite readable. Nothing special but readable. I won't actually recommend them though. Bourne has miracuously morphed into an 2000's action hero. What I do like is that there is continuity from novel to novel with many of the same characters, and that Bourne is appropriately deadly, super lethal as Ludlum originally wrote him. Bourne really has no equal. You don't mess with this guy. He's the ultimate operative.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 1:08 pm

tiffanywint wrote:
You said books, plural. Why would you read two if they were that "dull" ;)
I was bought all three as a gift, and felt somewhat obligated to read them. As such, I took a few different stabs at Ludlum's Bourne books. I only made it entirely through IDENTITY. I started, but never finished, SUPREMACY and ULTIMATUM.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 1:28 pm

Bourne film rankings

1. Identity
2. Supremacy
3. Quantum of Solace
4. Ultimatum
5. Legacy




6. please no more.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 17, 2012 3:31 pm

Harmsway wrote:
tiffanywint wrote:
You said books, plural. Why would you read two if they were that "dull" ;)
I was bought all three as a gift, and felt somewhat obligated to read them. As such, I took a few different stabs at Ludlum's Bourne books. I only made it entirely through IDENTITY. I started, but never finished, SUPREMACY and ULTIMATUM.

Funny, the same thing happened to me. I never tried ULTIMATUM, however.

I think I still have a bookmark somewhere in the first quarter of SUPREMACY, from around 2 years ago. laugh

I plan to see this on Saturday. Actually, that depends on if I feel like wasting my money come 8:30 on Saturday night.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Mon Aug 20, 2012 6:34 am

[quote="tiffanywint"][quote="Largo's Shark"]
Quote :
Born Cynical
by Armond White on Aug 10, 2012 • 4:45 am


Well said. This attitude is not as apparent in the first film, Identity, which is actually a decent update of the original novel, however IMO its all downhill after that with Supremacy and Ultimatum. These films bear no resemblance to the Ludlum novels, that they take their names from, which is one thing, but they are also alien to the tone of Ludlums broader literary ouevre. He published 23 novels before he died, 21 of them bearing his trademark suspense style. Each of the 21 is a stand-alone tour de force, page-turner. His books were impossible to put down. He was a master of tension and suspense. Ludlum however did not write with the same hyperactive degree of cynicism towards US intelligence efforts as the Bourne film producers seem to revel in. Rather he wrote smartly of conspiracies that reached into the highest levels of government, international commerce, intelligence circles, secret societies etc. It was riveting stuff. Occasionally escapist and venturing into Bond territory too. Several other film adaptations of his work have been done, notably The Osterman Weekend with Rutger Hauer and The Chancellor Manuscript with Michael Caine. These films were respectful of his work as was the original Bourne TV series with Richard Chamberlain.

But the Damon Bourne series goes right off the reservation. Good for Armond for calling them out and he's probably never even read the Ludlum books, but he can spot the cynicism which permeates the films, including the latest where it seems to be ramped up to new levels, whilst being completely devoid of any kind of interesting story, never mind a comprehensible one. Damon's Supremacy and Ultimatum can at least work as entertaining cinema fare, even if they insist on beating one over the head with their bizarre world view, but the newest Legacy barely even manages to entertain IMO. Renner and Weisz somewhat save the film, in that they do what they can with their characters, but Norton and his gang of ruthless coldblooded spymasters, operating from their high-tech control rooms, is just more more of the same recycled garbage that we saw in the last two films.

If you really want to enjoy the Bourne Identity, and that's what it is, an Identity, do yourself a favour and read the three original novels. Jason Bourne is an extremely well drawn literary character. You'll laugh at these crappy movies after reading the Ludlum originals.

YES!!! The novels are absolutely incredible, with the first being among the best books I've ever read, and the second going for broke in the Far East. I will admit that I thought Ultimatum was a let down. Still remember picking up the book tie-in because I enjoyed the Identity film version and being stunned that they were COMPLETELY 100% DIFFERENT! Impossible to put down, unbelievably creative, and so full of plot twists that your head explodes. This is adventure espionage writing.
The films are poor bastardizations of only the most general concept behind the novels. Only the first film has merit and to me this is due to the maverick workings of the original director Doug Liman, who had actively pursued the rights to Bourne for years and then once he had the production underway continually fought the studio all in order to make a more faithful feeling adaptation. So they odf course dumped him and destroyed the sequels with increasingly poor writing.
Strip away the shaky-cam and the supposed deep and important moments and you quickly realize how empty the two sequels are. They work as simple stories but on no other level do they exist and that is truly sad for a character so complex. The film Bourne couldn't last 5 minutes in the books, and that's saying something.

And will they stop with the continuation books? Legacy worked in a sense but was completely silly in the context of the originals. And now there's like 6 more? Come on!

Because I'm a sucker for any spy film, I'll probably sit through Legacy...
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:58 pm

hegottheboot wrote:

YES!!! The novels are absolutely incredible, with the first being among the best books I've ever read, and the second going for broke in the Far East. I will admit that I thought Ultimatum was a let down. Still remember picking up the book tie-in because I enjoyed the Identity film version and being stunned that they were COMPLETELY 100% DIFFERENT! Impossible to put down, unbelievably creative, and so full of plot twists that your head explodes. This is adventure espionage writing.
The films are poor bastardizations of only the most general concept behind the novels. Only the first film has merit and to me this is due to the maverick workings of the original director Doug Liman, who had actively pursued the rights to Bourne for years and then once he had the production underway continually fought the studio all in order to make a more faithful feeling adaptation. So they odf course dumped him and destroyed the sequels with increasingly poor writing.
Strip away the shaky-cam and the supposed deep and important moments and you quickly realize how empty the two sequels are. They work as simple stories but on no other level do they exist and that is truly sad for a character so complex. The film Bourne couldn't last 5 minutes in the books, and that's saying something.

And will they stop with the continuation books? Legacy worked in a sense but was completely silly in the context of the originals. And now there's like 6 more? Come on!

Because I'm a sucker for any spy film, I'll probably sit through Legacy...

Legacy can be sat through, although it would be an easier sit I think if one hasn't seen any of the previous films, because so much of it is just a rehash of stuff that we've already seen ie evil American spymasters, holed up in high-tech control room, using latest surveillance methods to track and kill one of their own, who did absolutely nothing to warrant such treatment, along with innocent girl along for the ride.

Back to books. Yes Identity IMO is one of the great thrillers of all time. Supremacy is a very worthy follow-up. While Ultimatum doesn't quite pack the same punch as the first two books, I think it was Ludlum's nod to the fans to tie up the Bourne saga and bring closure. By the end Bourne has shed the Identity, destroyed his arch nemesis, achieved closure and is settling down to live happily ever after. Never mind the EVL continuation novels, served up a few decades later. They are quite readable Bourne adventures, as EVL is a decent thriller writer in his own right, but it's really a very contrived alternative Bourne universe he's created, along the lines of, well lets pretend David Webb can't shed the Identity afterall. We'll kills his wife, just like Damon and Greengras did, and toss him back into the fray. 7 books later, new Bourne is going strong, but as far as I'm concerned authentic Bourne shed the Identity and settled down with Marie, with the files firmly closed onTreadstone and Carlos the Jackal.

What struck me about Ludlum's Bourne is not only the complexity of the character, but also that Ludlum convincingly writes him as having no equal. Bourne is the ultimate agent. I still stand in awe of Bourne's awesome abilities. He is master of everything -- disguise, weapons, spy tradecraft, close quarter combat, fitness, intellect, languages, and all born with the noblest of humility. Plus its all very credible within the context of where he came from, as we slowly discover more and more about his fascinating origins -- how David Webb came to assume the Identity. :shock:

A good thing about the popularity of the Bourne films though is that it has spurred a revival in Ludlum film adaptations. The Matarese Circle and The Chancellor Manuscript are both in development, with Denzel and DiCaprio both touted as potential leads. Marc Forster's name has surfaced as a potential director, but I don't think anything definitive has been announced re either project. According to Wiki at least, Matarese in 2013 with Denzel, and Chancellor in 2014 with DiCaprio.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Mon Aug 20, 2012 5:19 pm

I can understand the appeal of the novels, but I always found Ludlum's style to be a little heavy-handed and obtuse. He always seemed to exist on the fringes of the narrative, and never really cut to the chase when he should have. Sure, it padded the world of the novel out a little to make it feel a little bit more like the world existed beyond the story being told, but to me, Ludlum suffered from the most horrendous timing. He'd take his time when he should have gotten on with it, and he'd focus on the action when he should have held back and the end result was that I never quite got the sense that Jason Bourne lived up to the reputation he had within the world of the story. He was lumbering when he should have been sprinting.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Tue Aug 21, 2012 2:06 am

Novel Bourne was always trying to work out some conundrum. The fact that he had limited memory and wasn't quite sure who he was most of the time, slogged him down some, but when the Identity was on, when it was put into play, it was quite awesome. I thought Ludlum did a superb job developing the Legend or Identity as Bourne discovers who he is.

My favourite Bournism, "Rest is a weapon." Remember that if you are thinking of taking on some important task on short sleep. The Identity would not approve.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Tue Aug 21, 2012 9:30 am

It did take me admittedly a few attempts to make it through these, but once into the books, it starts to flow in a confusing mess just as real espionage would. To me it feels real almost unlike most spy novels due to this writing style. I want to read some of his other works, but was unsure where to start.

A true film adaptation of Identity would be grand, probably around 4 hours like some recent films (Ironically, Carlos) and a time period film that would be interesting because the 1980's are hardly covered in this way.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Tue Aug 21, 2012 4:13 pm

Harmsway wrote:
Personally, I found the Ludlum Bourne books to be quite dull.

::ducks::

I'm pretty sure I read the first one, when I picked up 3 or 4 of his novels after finishing a run of Frederick Forsyth in the late 80s. I don't remember anything about them, even how many of them I got through, just that I found his syntax kind of messed up a few times. The fact that I got hung up on something like that means I must not have gotten hooked into the storytelling at all. It might be unfair, but in my mind I just have characterized the Ludlum books as not worth bothering over again.

For espionage novels outside of Fleming and well-removed from any bestseller list, I'd strongly recommend the first 3 or 4 NOVEMBER MAN novels by Bill Granger (don't go much further or you will just get SO pissed off.) There was something by a guy named Mykel called THE WINDCHIME LEGACY that was very epic and yet had some SF elements ... I read it three or four times.

And Leonard Sanders wrote a couple of novels about a SPECTRE-wannabe operation called Hamlet that threatened world with nukes and with plutonium fired in the air, in THE HAMLET WARNING and THE HAMLET ULTIMATUM. Read them in reverse order, but loved them enough to revisit them at least 3 or 4 times last century. All of these books had strong antagonists -- even the ones that weren't written as well at least had some snappy good lines.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Tue Aug 21, 2012 4:41 pm

hegottheboot wrote:
It did take me admittedly a few attempts to make it through these, but once into the books, it starts to flow in a confusing mess just as real espionage would. To me it feels real almost unlike most spy novels due to this writing style. I want to read some of his other works, but was unsure where to start.

A true film adaptation of Identity would be grand, probably around 4 hours like some recent films (Ironically, Carlos) and a time period film that would be interesting because the 1980's are hardly covered in this way.

I'd recommend them all except for the ones that were published posthumously and there are about 4 of those. Personally I grant the author one posthumous publication finished by another. Fleming's was TMWTGG. Ludlum was so popular though that his estate milked the posthumous thing. Ludlum's writing style and attitudes were pretty obvious, so it's pretty clear where the finishing authors took over.

Otherwise he cranked out 23 books plus the 4 (!) that were finished for him. Discount the two that were comedies (Gandolfo and Omaha) and maybe the two thrillers that he published initially under a different pen name (Trevayne and Halidon), and you still have 19 awesome bonafide Ludlum thrillers, starting with Scarlatti Inheritance in 1971 and moving forward. I couldn't put down any of them. My favourites though besides Bourne might be Osterman Weekend from the early work and Parsifal Mosaic and Icarus Agenda from the mid-period. Actually the 8 thrillers that preceded Bourne Identity, all move at a nice pace and are all real grabbers. He peaks with Bourne Identity and then raises his game to even meatier more developed thrillers such as Parsifal, Acquitaine and Icarus and then he levels off somewhat with Bourne Ultimatum and what follows.

From wiki:

By Ludlum, published during the author's lifetime


  • The Scarlatti Inheritance (1971)
  • The Osterman Weekend (1972)
  • The Matlock Paper (1973)
  • Trevayne (1973, writing under the pen-name Jonathan Ryder)
  • The Cry of the Halidon (1974, writing under the pen-name Jonathan Ryder)
  • The Rhinemann Exchange (1974)
  • The Road to Gandolfo (1975, writing under the pen-name Michael Shepherd)
  • The Gemini Contenders (1976)
  • The Chancellor Manuscript (1977)
  • The Holcroft Covenant (1978)
  • The Matarese Circle (1979)
  • The Bourne Identity (1980)
  • The Parsifal Mosaic (1982)
  • The Aquitaine Progression (1984)
  • The Bourne Supremacy (1986)
  • The Icarus Agenda (1988)
  • The Bourne Ultimatum (1990)
  • The Road to Omaha (1992)
  • The Scorpio Illusion (1993)
  • The Apocalypse Watch (1995)
  • The Matarese Countdown (1997)
  • The Prometheus Deception (2000)

Credited to Ludlum, published posthumously



  • The Sigma Protocol (2001, the last novel written entirely by Ludlum)
  • The Janson Directive (2002)
  • The Tristan Betrayal (2003)
  • The Ambler Warning (2005)
  • The Bancroft Strategy (2006)
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 24, 2012 10:46 am

tiffanywint wrote:

Legacy can be sat through, although it would be an easier sit I think if one hasn't seen any of the previous films, because so much of it is just a rehash of stuff that we've already seen ie evil American spymasters, holed up in high-tech control room, using latest surveillance methods to track and kill one of their own, who did absolutely nothing to warrant such treatment, along with innocent girl along for the ride.

LEGACY is best watched as a prequel to the Damon films.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Aug 24, 2012 1:16 pm

Loomis wrote:


LEGACY is best watched as a prequel to the Damon films.

I'm not sure that would quite work as Legacy heavily references Ultimatum, although you could watch it first and then go back and find out who this Jason Bourne guy was and what these Treadstone and Blackbriar operations were all about.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Sep 21, 2012 11:35 am

Found this.

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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Sep 21, 2012 11:38 am

Craig looks... manlier.

I wonder what Mrs. Craig has to say in that interview.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:49 am

I saw the movie tonight, had won some free tickets and was waiting for my movie buddy having the night of. And I must say the movie did not disappoint at all. The story is far more in the vein of Ludlums original Bourne books where parties are uncertain about what is happening or who is happening and when all is clear **** is hitting the fan.

This Bourne movie was more to my liking than the last two with Damon, be honest I did like the first 2/3 of the last movie which went belly-up when he arrived in the US. This movie was a fairly well written continuation on the theme from the earlier movies albeit with a different Bourne-like operator. And once you find out what is mission really is about you find him more sympathetic than Damons' Bourne. (which is unlike Ludlums Bourne who seems like a nice guy with a set of dangerous skills).

As a spy-movie a thumbs-up, as an actioner it is so-so with some spectacular stuff in the beginning and end.

I can understand why folks expecting another Greengrass movie get disappointed this movie has less action and more story while Greengrass/damon has more action and less story to worry about.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:52 am

GeneralGogol wrote:
Craig looks... manlier.

Renner looks like a deadly hairdresser.
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Salomé
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Fri Oct 05, 2012 1:24 am

A terrible mess of a shameless money grab, that actually managed to damage the mythology created in the original two movies (I like to pretend the third never happened either).

Did anyone who watched the original believe we'd come to a point in the series where the plot would revolve around operatives who have been genetically altered through a virus? Imagine if they pulled the same nonsense with Bond. Even EON hasn't dared to defecate the bed to that extent.
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Sat Oct 06, 2012 12:43 am

Erm, Stromberg's underwater lair? Drax's space station? Colonel Moon's gene therapy and DIY space weapon? I do agree with your points about THE BOURNE SUPREMACY (although I quite enjoyed it on its own merits), but I think Eon has gone much further into the realms of ludicrousness (although, again, I enjoy the "outrageous" Bond flicks as much as the "down-to-earth" ones).
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PostSubject: Re: THE BOURNE LEGACY (2012)   Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:02 am

Loomis wrote:
Erm, Stromberg's underwater lair? Drax's space station? Colonel Moon's gene therapy and DIY space weapon? I do agree with your points about THE BOURNE SUPREMACY (although I quite enjoyed it on its own merits), but I think Eon has gone much further into the realms of ludicrousness (although, again, I enjoy the "outrageous" Bond flicks as much as the "down-to-earth" ones).

It's different with Bond. The ludicrousness is all in Fleming's work, if only in embryonic form. Gene therapy is a cutting edge take on Drax's plastic surgery in MR. On the other hand, I couldn't imagine genetically altered assassins or anything like that in a Ludlum Bourne novel.
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