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colly
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Mar 23, 2011 4:03 pm

Klown wrote:
colly wrote:
Klown wrote:
colly wrote:

Top 10 John Wayne Films.
Stagecoach ahead of Rio Bravo? WTF?

RIO BRAVO doesnt have Thomas Mitchell. Or Andy Devine. And it wasnt made in 1939.

What it does have is Ward Bond.

Ward Bond gets killed off though, thankfully. A shame it doesn't happen to Devine in Stagecoach. It's a pretty dull film with a by-the-numbers evil Indians/saved by the cavalry bullshit. I mean, Ford's visual sense is undeniable, but compare the stilted interactions in the stagecoach with the camraderie of Hawks' film, and there's no contest.

Considering there's little difference between numbers 2 and 4 out of a selection pool of 40 films... your trying to drag some extremes out of me. Just to me theres a little bit more magic in the air about STAGECOACH - more mythic if you will in its creation of Wayne, its resuscitation of the Western genre etc. Plus its got Thomas Mitchell winning an oscar for the greatest year known to man, spunky Claire Trevor and the rest of the crew. Its very much a little western that could as opposed to the awesomeness that is RIO BRAVO - theres always something satisfying about the good guys vs the bad guys. But I'm interested to note you dont call this kind of thing "bullshit" - when it was used Im sure just as many times as the Indians against everyone theme. And the Indians against everyone theme's a corker if its not the only force driving the picture - some of John Sturges films were like that. I think in STAGECOACH its well done.

lalala2004 wrote:
colly wrote:
I thought you wouldve laughed at "the politics is lame" - I did. ;)

And Lala - thumbs up on FROM HERE TO ETERNITY. :)

Were you the one I was trying to get to see it while you were going through some of Frank Sinatra's films, or was that someone else?

I can't remember :oops:

Guessing it wouldve been the Major - I've never done a Sinatra marathon. ;)

But its an absolutely golden film thats got plenty of awesomeness about it.
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HJackson
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Mar 23, 2011 6:58 pm

Arkadin wrote:
This list is a rough approximation of the current state of affairs of my cinematic tastes.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
2046 (2004, dir. Kar-Wai Wong)
THE 3-PENNY OPERA (1931, dir. G. W. Pabst)
ANDREI RUBLEV (1966, dir. Andrei Tarkovsky)
BARRY LYNDON (1975, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR (1959, dir. Alain Resnais)
LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD (1961, dir. Alain Resnais)
RAN (1985, dir. Akira Kurosawa)
THE TRIAL (1962, dir. Orson Welles)
WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? (1966, dir. Mike Nichols)
VERTIGO (1958, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)
VIVRE SA VIE (1962, dir. Jean-Luc Godard)

Unfortunately, I think this list comes across like I'm desperately putting on airs. Ah, well. It's sincere.
I had difficulty picking between Hiroshima mon Amour, Last Year at Marienbad and Muriel. I think I liked Muriel the most, actually, but I've only seen it once so I'm a little unfamiliar with it. In terms of the omissions to my list on page one, Barry Lyndon is certainly one. I generally find Kubrick's later films incredibly dull affairs, but Barry Lyndon has really stuck with me. It's achingly beautiful.

You mention Vivre sa vie, and other users have mentioned Breathless. If I'm honest, apart from Contempt, I don't like any Godard pre-Alphaville. Not a comment on your taste - I certainly understand the merit of the works, but I think I'm simply not a sophisticated enough viewer to appreciate them fully. It isn't until he starts getting brash and overtly political that I get excited. Characters reading aloud from tracts? Please Mr. Godard, give me more.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Mar 23, 2011 11:20 pm

HJackson wrote:
You mention Vivre sa vie, and other users have mentioned Breathless. If I'm honest, apart from Contempt, I don't like any Godard pre-Alphaville. Not a comment on your taste - I certainly understand the merit of the works, but I think I'm simply not a sophisticated enough viewer to appreciate them fully. It isn't until he starts getting brash and overtly political that I get excited. Characters reading aloud from tracts? Please Mr. Godard, give me more.
I lose interest in Godard once he starts getting all political. I have little time for stuff like PIERROT LE FOU. That's not to say he's not still impressive when he starts getting all political, but I prefer it when his films seek after something more human, like VIVRE SA VIE. Frankly, I'm astonished you find yourself somehow unable to appreciate those early films, because I've always thought them infinitely more accessible than his later, more complex work.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:05 am

I've come to terms with the fact that "2 or 3 Things I Know About Her" is a downright boring film.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:06 am

Mr. Brown wrote:
I've come to terms with the fact that "2 or 3 Things I Know About Her" is a downright boring film.
laugh
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lalala2004
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:38 am

colly wrote:
lalala2004 wrote:
colly wrote:
I thought you wouldve laughed at "the politics is lame" - I did. ;)

And Lala - thumbs up on FROM HERE TO ETERNITY. :)

Were you the one I was trying to get to see it while you were going through some of Frank Sinatra's films, or was that someone else?

I can't remember :oops:

Guessing it wouldve been the Major - I've never done a Sinatra marathon. ;)

But its an absolutely golden film thats got plenty of awesomeness about it.

Yeah, I had no clue who it was. You're probably right.

I tell people to watch that instead of Pearl Harbor. It didn't exactly take place there, but it's in the time frame, and it's better.....
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FourDot
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:22 am

lalala2004 wrote:
I tell people to watch that instead of Pearl Harbor. It didn't exactly take place there, but it's in the time frame, and it's better.....

Or you could watch Tora! Tora! Tora!. Sure, it might be boring, straight-laced reportage, but it boasts a bevy of bona fide badasses, like Marty Balsam, Jason Robards, E.G. Marshall, James Whitmore, Wesley Addy, Leon Ames...

Actually, is it just me, or are the Japanese sequences much much better in that film?

Actually, come to think of it, you're right. Just watch From Here to Eternity.
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HJackson
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 3:23 am

Arkadin wrote:
HJackson wrote:
You mention Vivre sa vie, and other users have mentioned Breathless. If I'm honest, apart from Contempt, I don't like any Godard pre-Alphaville. Not a comment on your taste - I certainly understand the merit of the works, but I think I'm simply not a sophisticated enough viewer to appreciate them fully. It isn't until he starts getting brash and overtly political that I get excited. Characters reading aloud from tracts? Please Mr. Godard, give me more.
I lose interest in Godard once he starts getting all political. I have little time for stuff like PIERROT LE FOU. That's not to say he's not still impressive when he starts getting all political, but I prefer it when his films seek after something more human, like VIVRE SA VIE. Frankly, I'm astonished you find yourself somehow unable to appreciate those early films, because I've always thought them infinitely more accessible than his later, more complex work.
They're a bit easier to swallow from a stylistic perspective, but I find the intellectual content a little more obscure (probably because I take more of an interest in his political concerns beyond the cinema). I understand what he's trying to say with stuff like Weekend and La chinoise more than I do with pieces like Breathless.

As for 2 or 3 Things, I find the first thirty or so minutes captivating, then I start dozing off. Not because there is a dip in quality, just because it is so heavy. I just can't watch it very easily.
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Salomé
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 4:48 am

Westerns:

1. Shane
2. She wore a Yellow Ribbon
3. Once upon a time in the West
4. Vera Cruz
5. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
6. The Wild Bunch
7. Stagecoach
8. The Searchers
9. The magnificent Seven
10. Comanche Station

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The White Tuxedo
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 4:59 am

Salomé wrote:
Westerns:

1. Shane
2. She wore a Yellow Ribbon
3. Once upon a time in the West
4. Vera Cruz
5. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
6. The Wild Bunch
7. Stagecoach
8. The Searchers
9. The magnificent Seven
10. Comanche Station


I wanted to do a Top 10 western one. I'll maybe try. laugh

1. ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST

Nine to go. I could probably name 10, but I'm damned if I can rank them. I'm terrible at ranking stuff. I don't know HOW FourDot does it with his list of films he's seen this year.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:09 am

Heist movies:

1. The Killing
2. Rififi (Dassin is another good one to add to our list of forgotten great directors, Erica)
3. Bob le Flambeur
4. Gun Crazy
5. Heat
6. The Getaway
7. How To Steal a Million
8. The Asphalt Jungle
9. Reservoir dogs
10. The Usual Suspects

I think I'm forgetting about a few good ones that could easily replace 9-10.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:10 am

The White Tuxedo wrote:
Salomé wrote:
Westerns:

1. Shane
2. She wore a Yellow Ribbon
3. Once upon a time in the West
4. Vera Cruz
5. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
6. The Wild Bunch
7. Stagecoach
8. The Searchers
9. The magnificent Seven
10. Comanche Station


I wanted to do a Top 10 western one. I'll maybe try. laugh

1. ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST

Nine to go. I could probably name 10, but I'm damned if I can rank them. I'm terrible at ranking stuff. I don't know HOW FourDot does it with his list of films he's seen this year.

I can no longer do it cross-genre. It's too hard to compare them.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:16 am

Salomé wrote:
2. Rififi (Dassin is another good one to add to our list of forgotten great directors, Erica)

I'm ashamed to say I passed on the opportunity to meet Dassin in London in 1998. He also directed Topkapi, based on my late uncle's novel, The Light of Day.

And great heist movies? Charley Varrick. One of the many great Don Siegel films. Someday the world will take notice. Oh yes.



Jacqueline Scott has a brief but telling part in this film.
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lalala2004
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:33 am

Musicals:

1. White Christmas
2. Fiddler on the Roof
3. The Sound of Music
4. The Wizard of Oz
5. West Side Story
6. South Pacific
7. Singing in the Rain
8. Guys and Dolls
9. Mary Poppins
10. Grease

A few I need to see that might make the list: On the Town and A Star is Born
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The White Tuxedo
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:43 am

ambler wrote:
Salomé wrote:
2. Rififi (Dassin is another good one to add to our list of forgotten great directors, Erica)

I'm ashamed to say I passed on the opportunity to meet Dassin in London in 1998. He also directed Topkapi, based on my late uncle's novel, The Light of Day.

And great heist movies? Charley Varrick. One of the many great Don Siegel films. Someday the world will take notice. Oh yes.



Jacqueline Scott has a brief but telling part in this film.

I just wish a widescreen DVD of it was available. Univeral fucked up on the DVD. Loved the film, though. Loved seeing Matthau in that smart, no BS kind of role. A hundred times better than NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN. Certainly a lot more fun.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:48 am

The White Tuxedo wrote:
[Charley Varrick is] A hundred times better than NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN. Certainly a lot more fun.

Yeah. I'm pretty sure the Coen Brothers had a good look at Varrick before they started filming.

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G section
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:06 am

TOP 10 WORST FILMS I'VE HAD THE MISFORTUNE OF SEEING:


1. Scooby-Doo 2 Monsters Unleashed (2004)
2. Racing Stripes (2005)
3. Passport To Paris (1999)
4. AVP : Aliens vs. Predator (2007)
5. The Man Who Sued God (2001)
6. Scooby-Doo (2002)
7. Pirates Of The Caribbean : At World’s End (2007)
8. Terminator 3: Rise Of The Machines (2003)
9. Thunderbirds (2004)
10. Cats And Dogs (2001)

Each and every one of them make Missile To The Moon look like a masterpiece.
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:26 am

G section wrote:
TOP 10 WORST FILMS I'VE HAD THE MISFORTUNE OF SEEING:

Wait till you see Strange Wilderness.
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G section
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:35 am

GeneralGogol wrote:
G section wrote:
TOP 10 WORST FILMS I'VE HAD THE MISFORTUNE OF SEEING:

Wait till you see Strange Wilderness.

Naturally I'll be avoiding it. ;)
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Louis Armstrong
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Apr 13, 2011 10:04 am

Just my favourites, subject to change at any time:

10. THE ROOM (2003)

"I just can't figure women out. Sometimes they're just too smart.
Sometimes they're flat-out stupid. Other times they're just evil."

A beautiful film.

9. SHAUN OF THE DEAD (2004)

"We had our jabs when we went to the Isle of Wight."
Either this or Hot Fuzz. Shaun's more consistent, I think. I've yet to see Scott Pilgrim.

8. THE BIRDCAGE (1996)

"So you're going to a cemetery with your toothbrush. How Egyptian."
I'm not sure if this is a favourite, but I've seen it so many times that it must be, right?

7. THE DARK KNIGHT (2008)

"I'm not wearing hockey pads!"
Just pulls me in and then up, like a skyhook.

6. STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (1951)

"My theory is that everyone is a potential murderer."
My #1 Hitchcock with a bullet. Need to see it again.

5. IN THE LOOP (2009)

"In England, we have a saying for a situation such as this,
which is that it's difficult-difficult-lemon-difficult."

Thanks FourDot.

4. ZOOLANDER (2001)

"Do I know what product I'm selling? No. Do I know what I'm doing today?
No. But I'm here, and I'm gonna give it my best shot."

laugh

3. 500 DAYS OF SUMMER (2009)

"Friends my balls!"
I'm young, okay? This stuff gets to me. Maybe I should watch Annie Hall sometime.

2. THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS (1987)

"Why didn't you learn the violin?"
So f***ing Phlegming-esque.

1. THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST (1988)

"Aren't your own sins enough for you?"
Thanks Arkadin.


As you can see, I have very fine taste.

I didn't know what to put on the list. And usually I love making lists. laugh There's so many films I enjoy, but few that I have great affection for.

It's overwhelming reading lists on here. Where do I start? Once I rented Apocalypse Now and Lawrence of Arabia, but never found the time to sit thought them. Oh well. Watched Chinatown last week. Strong contender for one of my favs. I'll definitely need to watch it again. It feels a bit strange watching a film like that and enjoying it so much, all while knowing the style of it can be found in much greater abundance quite a few years before the 70s... I'll have to stop by the noir thread. Needless to say, this board/this group of people has gotten me interested in a lot of films I never would've checked out otherwise. For that, cheers ya'll.
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The White Tuxedo
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:32 pm

G section wrote:
TOP 10 WORST FILMS I'VE HAD THE MISFORTUNE OF SEEING:


1. Scooby-Doo 2 Monsters Unleashed (2004)
2. Racing Stripes (2005)
3. Passport To Paris (1999)
4. AVP : Aliens vs. Predator (2007)
5. The Man Who Sued God (2001)
6. Scooby-Doo (2002)
7. Pirates Of The Caribbean : At World’s End (2007)
8. Terminator 3: Rise Of The Machines (2003)
9. Thunderbirds (2004)
10. Cats And Dogs (2001)

Each and every one of them make Missile To The Moon look like a masterpiece.

1. CRASH
2. MILLION DOLLAR BABY
3. GANGS OF NEW YORK
4. KING KONG (2005)
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Gotta work on that. laugh

And no, STAR TREK (2009) wouldn't be on the list.
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colly
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Thu Jun 02, 2011 1:15 pm

LA, please tell me you're joking with THE ROOM. laugh
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Mr. Trevelyan
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Fri Jun 03, 2011 3:23 am

Louis Armstrong wrote:
Just my favourites, subject to change at any time:

10. THE ROOM (2003)

"I just can't figure women out. Sometimes they're just too smart.
Sometimes they're flat-out stupid. Other times they're just evil."

A beautiful film.
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G section
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Sat Jul 23, 2011 12:19 am

Bumping this thread with my top 10 favourite World War II films, in reverse order.

10. Escape To Victory (1981, Huston)


Bare with me on this one. Yes, it's more of a sports flick than a war film, but this account of an allied POW team taking on the Nazi's on the battlefield of the football pitch is just so damn entertaining. Maybe it's seeing footballing greats such as Pelé, Bobby Moore and Osvaldo Ardiles in action. Maybe it's the implausibility of Sylvester Stallone making that penalty save. Maybe it's Max von Sydow's charismatic German major. Or even Stallone's banter with Michael Caine and romance with Carole Laure. I don't know. It's up there for me.

9. The Dam Busters (1955, Anderson)


Stirring stuff even now, over fifty years on. Richard Todd, a war hero both on-screen and off it, turns in one of my favourite lead performances from all the films listed here. A fitting tribute to the pilots of WWII and to the mission itself. And of course there's the theme tune.

8. Morituri (1965, Wicki)


Another top lead performance, this time from Marlon Brando as a German pacifist, blackmailed by the British to aid the sinking of an important Nazi ship with various explosive devices. Yul Brynner is the captain of the vessel but it's Martin Benrath who stands out , becoming increasingly uncomfortable in the presence of Janet Margolin's beautiful Jewish aid-worker. Perhaps more famous as being the film which ignited Brando and Trevor Howard's mutual loathing, this is tense viewing. Quality score too.

7. The Sea Wolves - The Last Charge of the Calcutta Light Horse (1980, McLaglen)


You can keep your Where Eagles Dare's and Guns Of Navaronne's, this is my personal favourite of the WWII action films, if only for the teaming up of Gregory Peck, Roger Moore, David Niven, Trevor Howard and Patrick MacNee's group of war vets. Add to that the beautiful Barbara Kellerman and some top quality suspense and battle scenes, this thoroughly deserves it's place on my list. 8)

6. The Great Escape (1963, Sturges)


This needs no introduction.

5. The Bridge On The River Kwai (1957, Lean)


As I've said elsewhere, not my favourite of the Lean epics but the defining example of the British "stiff upper lip" movie, if only because of the scene in which Alec Guinness stands upright to attention in the searing heat for hours on end, purely out of self-pride. Revel in it's sheer excess. A marvel of a film.

4. The First Of The Few (1942, Phillips)


Leslie Howard directs, produces and stars as R. J. Mitchell, the inventor of one of the most influential pieces of engineering, during World War II , the Spitfire plane. David Niven co-stars as test pilot, Geoffrey Crisp, who undertakes a series of races against German, Italian and American planes, competing for the Schneider Trophy. Although primarily set well before the war breaks out, I couldn't exclude it from the list. It's a wonderful tale that's full of touching, very memorable scenes. Can't sum it up.

3. A Bridge Too Far (1977, Attenborough)


Very nearly made it to the top. In terms of historical accuracy, it is the best film on the list. And as for the scale of the film, well, nothing like it will ever be attempted again - the aerial scenes are staggering. In an era of CGI, looking back at the visuals of this film is a mindblowing experience. Plus it helps that there's an all star cast, too many to name here, and one of the most moving endings ever put on film.

2. The One That Got Away (1957, Baker)


The antithesis of The Great Escape. Hardy Krüger (who could have been a real star, what a waste of talent) plays Franz Von Werra in this true story of his escape from Britain. Featuring some cracking photography, terrific dialogue scenes and my favourite of all the lead performances from the films listed here, this is a very fine film.

1. Indigènes (2006, Bouchareb)


I don't think I've ever seen a film that has moved me as much as this one has and continues to do so on each viewing, most likely down to it's honest portrayal of the characters ; North African troops drafted into the French army to fight for a country they've never seen. A brilliant, brilliant ensemble cast. No need for bloody battle scenes or inspiring speeches. Just raw, genuine emotion. Incredible.


Last edited by G section on Sat Jul 23, 2011 1:13 am; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: Top 10   Sat Jul 23, 2011 1:05 am

Top Ten Truffaut:

1. STOLEN KISSES
2. DAY FOR NIGHT
3. SMALL CHANGE
4. JULES AND JIM
5. SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER
6. THE 400 BLOWS
7. THE GREEN ROOM
8. THE SOFT SKIN
9. THE WILD CHILD
10. THE BRIDE WORE BLACK
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