These forums may contain mild adult content and are not associated with EON, Sony or any other companies and do not reflect their views.
 
HomeHome  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Supernatural Horror Films

Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, 4
AuthorMessage
Perilagu Khan
Chief Executive
Chief Executive
avatar

Posts : 3737
Member Since : 2011-03-22
Location : The high plains

PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   Sun Sep 02, 2018 11:54 am

Haunters (2013)

Independent Canadian filmmakers are turning out some pretty good supernatural horror flicks these days and Haunters is a case in point. This picture revolves around a family of four ghosts who are trapped in a time loop, reliving each day over and over, but only the teenage daughter, Lisa Johnson (Abigail Breslin), realizes that something is very wrong. Eventually, through dint of brains and guts and desperation, she uncovers the horror of the situation. The house that they haunt was occupied from circa 1953 to 1983 by a serial killer who kidnapped young girls, subdued them with ether and then threw them in the furnace located in the basement of the house. He was never caught and died presumably of natural causes in 1983. But the killer wasn't done yet. His ghost remained in the house, possessed Lisa's father, and killed the entire family as well as himself. The killer was attempting to reprise the ghastly/ghostly deed with the house's current occupants, and it befell to Lisa to try to save that family and destroy the killer's ghost. I won't say whether she was successful here.

All in all, this is one scary flick that is brought to life by an obscure cast that nevertheless turns in an excellent collective performance. Time loops are inherently frightening and it's slightly surprising that they don't figure into more horror plots. Probably a good thing though, because they would quickly become hackneyed.

At any rate, I highly recommend this film. The plot is slightly convoluted, but I think it ultimately makes sense. And if you're a bit unsure, you'll enjoy watching it again to try to suss it all out.
Back to top Go down
Blunt Instrument
Chief Executive
Chief Executive
avatar

Posts : 3623
Member Since : 2011-03-20
Location : Belfast, Northern Ireland

PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   Sun Sep 02, 2018 9:31 pm

Sounds a bit like the scary movie version of Groundhog Day.
Back to top Go down
Perilagu Khan
Chief Executive
Chief Executive
avatar

Posts : 3737
Member Since : 2011-03-22
Location : The high plains

PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   Mon Sep 03, 2018 12:20 am

I haven't actually seen Groundhog Day, but one film critic did mention that film in connexion with Haunter.
Back to top Go down
Erica Ambler
Chief Executive
Chief Executive
avatar

Posts : 6277
Member Since : 2011-08-05
Location : Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein euro

PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:22 pm

Erica Ambler wrote:
To my great surprise, this remake looks like it might be worth seeing:



I am amused by the conceit of remaking one of the most glorious Technicolour films ever made in a washed-out Berlin grey.

Goblin, or what's left of them (Claudio Simonetti), have been touring the original Suspiria and playing the soundtrack live. Gutted to have missed this UK date last month:

Back to top Go down
hegottheboot
Senior Correspondent
avatar

Posts : 511
Member Since : 2012-01-09
Location : TN, USA

PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   Thu Sep 06, 2018 6:22 pm

Perilagu Khan wrote:
Any of you seen BBC's Count Dracula (1977) starring Louis Jourdan as the Bloke with the Cloak? This may be my favorite Dracula rendition. The entire production has an ethereal, dreamlike quality that suits the material perfectly, and Frank Finlay is the best Van Helsing I've yet seen. Jourdan provides the title character with a certain genteel menace that is, I think, unique. And Jack Sheperd lends a sympathetic pathos to the mad Renfield. Less successful are the special effects, which look like something out of Sesame Street, and Richard Barnes' naff Texas accent as the character Quincey Holmwood. Count Dracula is, therefore, imperfect, but may quite possibly still be the finest Dracula yet committed to film.

It's been too long-I need to try it again but I remember it felt a bit stagey for me and too much like a TV adaptation. In terms of getting more of the book across perhaps, but nothing compares to Horror of Dracula and the classic status of Universal's 1931 original. The name Van Helsing immediately conjures Cushing and Van Sloan to mind, for me there are no others. In terms of the Count being genteel I'd agree outside of what of what Lee is able to show in flashes in the opening of Horror of Dracula and what Lugosi could have done given the chance.
But Renfield is forever linked to Dwight Frye who so owns that role it typecast him forever.

That said the BBC versions beats the pants off the awfully drawn out boring 1979 film.
Back to top Go down
Perilagu Khan
Chief Executive
Chief Executive
avatar

Posts : 3737
Member Since : 2011-03-22
Location : The high plains

PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   Thu Sep 06, 2018 11:40 pm

hegottheboot wrote:
Perilagu Khan wrote:
Any of you seen BBC's Count Dracula (1977) starring Louis Jourdan as the Bloke with the Cloak? This may be my favorite Dracula rendition. The entire production has an ethereal, dreamlike quality that suits the material perfectly, and Frank Finlay is the best Van Helsing I've yet seen. Jourdan provides the title character with a certain genteel menace that is, I think, unique. And Jack Sheperd lends a sympathetic pathos to the mad Renfield. Less successful are the special effects, which look like something out of Sesame Street, and Richard Barnes' naff Texas accent as the character Quincey Holmwood. Count Dracula is, therefore, imperfect, but may quite possibly still be the finest Dracula yet committed to film.

It's been too long-I need to try it again but I remember it felt a bit stagey for me and too much like a TV adaptation. In terms of getting more of the book across perhaps, but nothing compares to Horror of Dracula and the classic status of Universal's 1931 original. The name Van Helsing immediately conjures Cushing and Van Sloan to mind, for me there are no others. In terms of the Count being genteel I'd agree outside of what of what Lee is able to show in flashes in the opening of Horror of Dracula and what Lugosi could have done given the chance.
But Renfield is forever linked to Dwight Frye who so owns that role it typecast him forever.

That said the BBC versions beats the pants off the awfully drawn out boring 1979 film.

Fortunately for Dracula fans, there is a relative wealth of quality renditions out there to enjoy and discuss. Hence, I rather fancy Coppola's Drac of 1992. If BBC's version had had special effects as good as Coppola's, well...
Back to top Go down
Perilagu Khan
Chief Executive
Chief Executive
avatar

Posts : 3737
Member Since : 2011-03-22
Location : The high plains

PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   Yesterday at 12:48 pm

Nosferatu the Vampire

Werner Herzog's remake of F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu, which itself is a German version of Bram Stoker's Dracula, is simply tremendous. Klaus Kinski's portrayal of Dracula, however, is dramatically--so to speak--different from other renditions. Whereas the traditional rendering of the count highlights his dashing looks and seductive qualities, Kinski's Dracula is barely even human. He is entirely bald, has ears like battered saucers, claw-like hands with veritable talons, and incisors to make the head beaver blush in shame. He is an eternal figure who has been battered and bludgeoned into deformity by the centuries, and his damaged physiognomy would ordinarily inspire a certain amount a sympathy. Alas, Kinski's Dracula is so physically repugnant and ghastly, however, that the viewer is much more likely to feel revulsion than pathos.

Nosferatu scores top marks for aesthetics. The rustic scenery as Jonathan Harker (Bruno Ganz) wends his way to Castle Dracula is wild and dramatic. The sojourn feels like a cross between ancient Germanic exploration and a pilgrimage to Bayreuth. And indeed, Herzog's use of Wagner's prelude to Das Rheingold, intensifies the effect.

The score, incidentally, is marvelous. Popol Vuh's threnodies and dirges strike dread in the viewer, and the Wagner creates a sense of febrile ecstasy. Indeed, as the ghost ship carrying Dracula and a teeming host of rats, arrive in Wismar (the German analogue to Stoker's London), the film becomes a fever dream. Herzog chooses to recreate the ambience of the Black Death, as the citizens of Wismar succumb in Dracula's wake, and the centerpiece of this approach is sequences of people dancing, dining and making merry in the town square as death closes in. The atmosphere is positively medieval, with touches of Edgar Allen Poe's "Masque of the Red Death" interposed for good measure.

Nosferatu is a bone-chiller supreme through virtually every frame. The aforementioned medieval ecstasy sequence occur in the final quarter of the film, but its opening, which shows Lucy Harker's night terrors in the form of a display of mummies, and slow-motion imagery of a bat in flight, all accompanied by Popul Vuh's oppressive sonorities, is as horrifying as anything in the entire picture.

Herzog's achievement here is large. He took the well-worn material of Stoker and Murnau and created something unique and significant. This is cinematic horror that succeeds on artistic, psychological and historical planes. Nosferatu is a work of genius.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Supernatural Horror Films   

Back to top Go down
 
Supernatural Horror Films
Back to top 
Page 4 of 4Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, 4

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Bond And Beyond :: Beyond :: Film News & Film Discussion-
Jump to: